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Poisionous Plants to Cats and Dogs

We all love flowers and plants, even our furry friends. But some plants can be very dangerous for cats and dogs. Our handy Poisonous Plants page helps you identify which plants are toxic to dogs and which plants are toxic to cats, helping you to choose the perfect bouquet for a home with pets.

What plants are poisonous to cats?

Many plants are poisonous to cats but the main one to watch out for is lilies. Every part of the flower is poisonous to cats, including the water it is kept in and even a small amount can be fatal. Our advice is to avoid purchasing lilies for loved ones with cats.

Other common plants toxic to cats include:

  • Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.
  • Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale).
  • Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron sp.)
  • Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
  • Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
  • Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
  • English Ivy (Hedera helix)
  • Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
  • Lilies (Lilium sp.)
  • Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
  • Oleander (Nerium oleander)
  • Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
  • Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
  • Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
  • Spanish thyme (Coleus ampoinicus)
  • Yew (Taxus sp.)

For a full list of flowers and plants toxic to cats visit the Cats Protection website.

What plants are poisonous to dogs?

Dogs, especially puppies, are natural curious animals and love to chew things they probably shouldn’t. With that in mind it’s a good idea to keep them away from plants and flowers where possible. Budding gardeners should be especially careful when it comes to Daffodils. Ingesting a bulb can lead to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and in some cases death.

Common plants toxic to dogs include:

  • Autumn Crocus (Colchicum autumnale)
  • Azaleas and Rhododendrons (Rhododendron sp.)
  • Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila)
  • Castor Bean (Ricinus communis)
  • Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.)
  • Cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.)
  • English Ivy (Hedera helix)
  • Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe sp.)
  • Lilies (Lilium sp.)
  • Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
  • Oleander (Nerium oleander)
  • Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum sp.)
  • Daffodil (Narcissus)
  • Peony (Paeonia)
  • Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta)
  • Tulip and Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa and Narcissus sp.)
  • Yew (Taxus sp.)

For a full list of flowers and plants toxic to dogs visit the Dog's Trust website.

How can I tell if my pet has been poisoned?

Depending on the plant, the symptoms of poisoning may present themselves differently. However since many plants are irritants, especially for the gastrointestinal tract, the symptoms of poisoning are likely to affect the mouth, throat and stomach more than other areas.

If you suspect your pet may have been poisoned you should look for:

  1. Difficulty breathing (if the airways are affected)
  2. Drooling or difficulty swallowing (if the mouth, throat, or esophagus is affected)
  3. Vomiting (if the stomach or intestines are affected)
  4. Diarrhea (if the intestines or colon are affected)
  5. Excessive drinking and urinating (if the kidneys are affected)
  6. Fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat (if the heart is affected)

While these symptoms may help guide you, they may not show immediately, and in some cases may not show at all. If you suspect - or know - your pet has ingested something toxic take immediate action and contact your vet or call the 24/7 Animal Poison Line on 01202 509000.

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